Artwork and Artist

The Line in Michelangelo's sculpture Pieta (1498-1500)

Pieta is a sculpture that was carved by Michelangelo in 1498 when he was commissioned by a cardinal called Jean De Billheres to create a sculpture that would go to the side of the Old St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. Michelangelo embarked on using the Carrara marble to curve out the "Pieta" that became more famous that he actually anticipated in the first place. The sculptor indicated alter that the piece of marble was the most perfect one that he had ever used in his sculpting career. He later embarked on polishing it and refining it thoroughly, far much more than any other previous sculptures he had ever created. The result was an outstanding sculpture depicting Virgin Mary carrying the dead body of Jesus Christ before he was taken to the tomb. The sculpture received significant praise and appreciation when it was launched to the public. This praise and fame would go on over the next six decades that Michelangelo lived and even to the current day. There was however the outstanding criticism that the face of Virgin Mary looks too young to be the mother of a thirty-year-old Jesus, to which he responded that women who keep themselves pure, like Mary did, retain their young looks more than those who are not chaste (Italian Renaissance.org, 2015). One outstanding aspect of the sculpture is the use of the curved lives to create the depth and three dimensions particularly in the dress that clothes Virgin Mary. The lines are so refined and appear to be continuously running into each other throughout the dress. Currently, this magnificent piece of art is displayed in New St. Peter's Basilica in Rome.

The Shape in -Bronze Oba head, Benin mid-19th century

The Oba head that was usually made of bronze was a common thing in Benin, the now Nigeria and was done whenever a king died. The Oba head was a Bronze sculpture tat only portrayed the head of the individual that was being immortalized through the sculpture. One of the first responsibilities of the son who succeeded his father was to ensure there was a bronze head of the deceased king (Oba) made and erected on the alter. There were skilled craftsmen who were charged with the making of this Oba head out of bronze and usually this art was taught to the succeeding generation. The initial Bronze Oba Head were seen to have thin walls but the later Oba heads are seen to have thicker walls presumably due to availability of abundance of bronze with time. The Oba head is an art form that was predominant in the 19th Century when Benin residents used this to immortalize their dead kings as a tradition and as a sign of respect. Since these pieces of art were several, as many as the dead kings, they are found scattered across several museums in Nigeria and even some made their way abroad in various art museums (The Metropolitan Museum, 2015). The Oba head had a wide and cylindrical shape with beaded solar covering and some clusters of additional beads to the crown. The cheeks of the Oba heads generally looked swollen and the eyes enlarged and as the decades progressed, these features of the shape appeared to more exaggerated over and over.

Texture in -Bernardo Rossellino, Tomb of Leonardo Bruni, Santa Croce, Florence 1444

Leonardo Bruni was a renaissance artist who experimented with styles, shapes and texture to express his messages. The Tomb of Leonardo Bruni was one of the many art works that he curved and had both the social message and the political message. Leonardo Rossellino was commissioned to make a sculpture for the tomb of a humanist chancellor called Leonardo Bruni in 1444 and he set out to make a tomb sculpture that was befitting for the status and stature of the chancellor. What makes this sculpture outstanding is the harmonious integration of the figures in the architectural frame, this is what made this monument a model to be copied for a whole century. The arch…