In the past Corporal Punishment was used in schools as a way of changing children's behavior. There have been many studies and debates over corporal punishment but no real conclusion has been made. People that want to have corporal punishment in schools say that it is not abusive and if it is not used, violence will increase in schools. They say that it is in the Bible to use a rod and if you spare it then you spoil the child (Slater 2).

People that oppose the use of corporal punishment in schools argue that it is abusive to children, both physically and emotionally. They say that it does more damage then good to the behavior of children (Saadeh 87).

Through my research, it became apparent that my own beliefs were mixed. I felt that because I was spanked and since I turned out all right, that all these kids that have behavior problems, needed was a spanking. After researching the topic, I realized that there are better ways to correct a child. Ways that do not humiliate or stress a child. These ways should be implemented and save spanking for a last resort. .

As of April 1, 2003, the states in our area, Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky, are still legally allowed to use corporal punishment as disciplinary action, although it is up to the discretion of the school district if they actually use it. Only 29 states have enacted laws that prohibit corporal punishment in schools (Slater 1). .

Corporal punishment can occur in many forms:.

-Hitting with a stick, ruler, or paddle.

-Spanking with a rope, switch, or whip/belt.

-Punching, slapping, choking.

-Pushing/pulling of the arms.

-Squeezing hands or arms.

-Pulling hair.

-Strapping down or locking in closets, storage rooms or in boxes.

The majority of injuries that can occur during one of these acts include soreness and redness of the affected area. In some cases, the injuries can be as severe as hemorrhaging and nerve and muscle damage (Benatar 238).