Hydrogen fuel cells will more than likely eventually replace the internal combustion engine entirely. Hydrogen is much more efficient and safer than the internal combustion engine. There are however still several problems dealing with storage and infrastructure that must be worked out. Safe means of storage that are still effective have not been fully developed yet. Investors are weary to build up an infrastructure for a vehicle that is yet to be fully worked out and customers are weary to buy a vehicle without proper infrastructure. There are many solutions that are on the market including; nickel hydride batteries, sodium borohydride storage, and fuel processors. New legislations is slowly trying to make the switch from the internal combustion engine to the hydrogen fuel cell.

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INTRODUCTION.

Background.

Fuel cells were first recognized in the early 1960s (Iovine, 2001). NASA decided to use fuel cells as a power source in American spacecraft. They generated electric power for the spaceship. The only waste product was water which is good for the astronauts. Now fuel cells are recognized by how clean burning they are and are being used in automobiles. These aren't the first hydrogen powered cars, though. William Grove constructed the first one in the 1830s. They are just now, however, becoming popular.

Purpose/Audience.

This informative paper about the use of hydrogen fuel cells in automobiles will examine a few of the advantages and problems of hydrogen fuel cells. The writing is directed towards a technical writing professor with at least a little background knowledge on the subject.

Sources.

Information for this report was obtained from several reputable scientific journals that were found on the University Libraries search engine on the Western Michigan University webpage.

Limitations.

The primary focus of this paper is to informative in nature, but readers will not find specific instructions on how a hydrogen fuel cell works.