PopulationOrder

From domains that focus on the appearance and development of the human being, such as history, geography, linguistics, philosophy or psychology to more objective areas such as biology, physics or natural sciences, it seems that for every segment that contributes to the extended field of knowledge, there is a science and a domain of activity that has devoted itself to the research and constant achievement of new information regarding that particular area of interests. Therefore, one should not appear surprised that there also exists a science concerned with the society one lives in, a science called Sociology.

Yet, most of the people are taken aback by the existence of this new science with pretentions of studying what they consider as being obvious and which questions facts that are assumed as being true by most of the members of a group. Generally, people think that they know everything or at least what needs to be known about the society they live in and, anyway, these pieces of information do not have a specific beginning point or a particular base. One is aware of them due to the simple fact that they express the day-to-day reality.

Up to a point, this approach may be understandable for psychologists and sociologists. To begin with, people did not wait for a science called sociology to appear in order to start wondering and searching for answers to their questions regarding the group or the society they lived in. Today, sociologists refer to this period as "the sociology of common sense," meaning it was not founded on a scientific base.

Secondly, every member of a society with a minimum intellectual level is capable of talking about what is good and what is bad in his or her group, what needs to be improved and how should the life of this group be organized.

Yet, the mechanisms that stand behind a modern society are more complex than people generally assume. A population's needs, problems or issues are extremely diversified and one can only satisfy and, respectively, resolve them through the agency of a critical thinking which would gain a better understanding of the problems by exploring not only the effects, but also the causes, along with suitable intervention strategies and methods of avoiding particular issues.

Therefore, the current paper work focuses on the importance of using critical thinking when trying to identify the causes of social problems or issues, by taking the example of a certain segment, the population of Germany.

The name of the German state and the historical actions and events that relate to it made the history of this country remarkable and Germany became one of the most important figures, especially for the last century, a country known as extremely influent, powerful, with a significant number of resources of all kinds: human, territorial, financial, political etc. In other words, one of the greatest state powers from Europe.

As a main characteristic of Germany's history, one can say that a constant issue was related to the division of the country's territory into some kind of confederations, federations or unitary states. In 1849 there were issues about monarchical vs. liberal government. Then, in 1919, with the major role of Prussia being dominant in the territory, there were questions regarding the number and size of the constituent states, called "Landers." But the major event that shook Germany from basement was the state's engagement in the two World Wars, action that subsequently proved to be devastating for it, especially when referring to the Second World War.

In 1945, at the end of the War, Germany failed to achieve its goals and surrendered. One should remind the contribution of Adolf Hitler to this failure. Although the name of the despotic leader is generally related to the Holocaust phenomenon, what interests for the current issue is the other category of negative effects that Germany suffered, the major territory loss. The country was reprieved of a quarter of its pre-war territory and, four years later, in 1949, was divided into two distinctive federations, West Germany and East Germany, separated by the famous Berlin's Wall, the symbol of the German's Communism. While West Germany was founded as a democratic, federal and welfare state, East Germany became component of the Communist block and developed a completely different political and…