The world is full of different people, some of them are good, kind and helpful and some of them are bad, vicious and criminals. But what really make people who or what they are? Are they born this way or is it different experiences in their lives that made them who they are. Or maybe it's a little bit of both?.

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So I would like to take this opportunity to engage these questions and refer to some psychological experiments in order to shed some light on these questions.

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When I was a kid I used to nag a lot about anything, until my dad got tired of me and then he"d twist my ear so hard that I"d stop nagging for a good time. I consider my self to be a good person, I"m nice to people, helpful and I don't lose my temper easily, but when it comes to someone nagging I just cant take a lot of it, I might lose my temper sometimes. Did I grow up to be like my dad or was I simply born like that? I don't know.

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A few days ago I was at work, which involves customer service and I was trying to help this guy with his problem, but there was nothing I can do, I wanted to help him but I couldn't. He didn't understand that I guess and he just kept nagging and nagging about it, I tried to stay cool and I did, but for a moment I felt like I wanted to punch him in the face and maybe I would have if I didn't need my job very badly. So I guess what I"m trying to get at here is even though I"m usually a good person something small and stupid just might be enough to motivate me to do evil, I have the potential for evil.

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Now that's just me, I might be insane or something. So let's refer to a psychological experiment conducted by Stanley Milgram in the 1960s. He wanted to know how many people would obey an authority figure when ordered to do actions against their own ethical believes. The volunteers thought they were participating in a study to see the effect of punishment on learning. The volunteers were assigned to a "teacher" role, they will be seated in front of a machine that conducts electric shocks to the "learner" every time he made a mistake reciting a list of word pairs he was supposed to have memorized.