Just think how tough it was in Russia to be a Polish officer as a Prisoner of War. But if you don"t have a time machine to put yourself back at that time, then pick up a copy of The Long Walk and put yourself in Slavomir Rawicz shoes, then you will be aware of how tough it really was with all the unbelievable harsh events during World War II. It is a story of the determination and will to be free, or one's personal account showing how one would strive for freedom.

The Long Walk is a true story written by Slavomir Rawicz describing what pain and anguish he was put through as a prisoner. This story is a detailed account of Rawicz life. Rawicz was taken from his home for be accused by the Russians of being a spy. They thought this because he was in the military and lived near the border. He then spent a year in Lubyanka prison. He was treated terribly, he had to stand in a kishka, it was a small room with a dimmed light over twenty feet high, and Rawicz was only let out to be questioned by the Russians. Rawicz spent much of his.

time at this prison being mentally and physically punished by "The Bull" for something he never did. "The Bull" was a man who was going to do whatever It took to get Rawicz to sign a document that stated Rawicz was a spy. Eventually, he had Rawicz poisoned, because he knew Rawicz would have never signed it if he was aware.

Rawicz went on trial and was then sentenced to 25 years of labor. That is when the journey began. He was being sent to an unknown destination with thousands of other prisoners aboard a train. The train ride in itself was hell. There were freezing cold conditions and everyone was so tightly condensed into a small place where no one could move. After that, the men were then let out into a potato field where there was no escape from the freezing winds. Many men died there, as well as some died on the train. After the train ride ended, the "long walk" began.